Travel Memorabilia

Hello friends! It has been more than a month the last time I have made an entry here. I just came from yet another pretty tiresome, but definitely fun-filled series of travels. I will try to post some of these recent adventures sometime soon. In the meantime, here is a short sharing of what I love to buy and bring home during travel.

Traveling is a very rewarding experience. After a trip, one goes home with innumerable mementos — from incomparable life lessons to new found friends, to of course uncountable photographs, and memories to cherish a lifetime.

Aside from these, I have also developed a habit of bringing home a physical memorabilia that comes in different forms. Before, I would make sure I get to buy at least a keychain or a fridge magnet as a souvenir from my trip.

Today, i have gone beyond these usual stuff. Whenever I go on a travel, I alot a certain amount of my money to buy some of the things I personally collect. Some of these include miniature building decors/displays like an Eiffel Tower from France, a Burf Khalifa and Burj Al Arab from my Dubai travel or a Milad Tower I bought in Iran from a recent trip and many more.

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Also, I make sure that I have a paper bill and some coins to spare for my currency collection. Some of my friends actually like these as my pasalubong to them since some of them also have this kind of colkection. I happen to collect also Starbucks tumblers and diecast planes. I am even starting to collect some books and dolls unique to a certain place I have visited. And lastly, I also bring home some paintings which I plan to use as wall decors when my dream of putting up my own cafe comes into fruition.

I know these are just material mementos and the memories that go with the travel are still far more important. Nonetheless, it feels good to see tangible reminders as to how awesome one particular trip was.

 

Don’t be a wasted soul, be JUANderlust. Take it easy everyJuan.

Captivating Auckland City

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From among the cities I have been the past 12 months, I have left a piece of myself in the City of Sails. The moment I have set foot in Auckland, I knew right there and then that I would love the city the way I have always loved my ex-girlfriend. I tried my best to think through the reasons why I have been enamored by Auckland but I almost always end up lost for the right words.

Because of this dilemma, I just opted to let you see this beyond alluring city through my lens. Here are some of my uncountable Auckland City photographs.

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Don’t be a wasted soul, be Juanderlust. Take it easy everyJuan.

In Photos: Hong Kong

ong Kong is an autonomous territory, and a former British colony, located at the southeastern portion of China. It is one of the most visited travel destination at this side of Asia because of its a vibrant, skyscraper-studded skyline and the many natural and man-made attractions. It also boasts off its highly urbanized centers as it is a well-established global financial hub. Furthermore, Hong Kong is a shopping paradise, and a food destination. Day or night, Hong Kong is simply mesmerizing.

Here are some snapshots during my brief Hong Kong visit. Will add more soon.

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Don’t be a wasted soul, be Juanderlust. take it easy everyJuan.

Alibijaban Island (Quezon, Philippines)

Alibijaban is a small, tadpole-shaped island located off the southeastern coast of the Bondoc Peninsula in Luzon, Philippines. It is part of the coastal town of San Andres in Quezon Province. Primarily known for its pristine mangrove forest and coral reefs, the island has slowly captured the attention of adventure seekers and beach enthusiasts. Alibijaban features white sandy beaches and abundant bird life.

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It is interesting to note that the mangrove forest (which boasts at least 22 mangrove species) covered about 140 hectares of the island’s central and northern portions and protected under the National Integrated Protected Areas System as a wilderness area. At the same time, the 225 hectares surrounding water is a habitat to a rich marine life and has been declared a marine protected area as well.

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The island is most accessible from the port of San Andres via motorized boat and will only take around 30 minutes of travel time. One may opt to camp in one of its beach areas or may choose to stay at simple homestays. During our visit, we only did a day trip as we were headed to the Burias Group of Islands for an overnight stay.

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It may have been a short stay in this promising backpacker destination, but it was sure fun bumming, and snorkeling. Maybe next time I should go for an overnight stay. I’ve heard both the sunrise and sunset are also great at this part of Quezon.

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Don’t be a wasted soul, be Juanderlust. Take it easy everyJuan.

Snapshots from Stockholm

Stockholm – a beautiful city on water. Where modernity meets tranquility. With its vibrant, trend-setting cafes and restaurants; lovely buildings, and idyllic coastline – Stockholm is a feast to the sense of sight.

Here are some of my photographs in Stunning Stockholm, Sweden!

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Don’t be a wasted soul, be Juanderlust. Take it easy everyJuan.

Romblon, PH

It’s a pretty lazy Sunday. So I opted to go through my Facebook photos and saw this Romblon album. It brought back memories of my stolen hard drive where all of my 2005 to 2013 HD travel photos were stored. Twas one of the most heartbreaking things that happened to me.

So I am reposting here the photos from my Hambil Island, Romblon in June of 2013. The photos were just downloaded from my FB so quality may not be very good.

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San Jose is a fifth-class municipality in the province of Romblon, Philippines. It is more commonly known as Carabao Island, or Hambil Island, and is located the southern tip of Tablas Island. It is in close proximity to the world-renowned Boracay Island, separated by a narrow body of water called Hambil Channel.

In June of 2013, during a trip to Boracay, I came to see what this Romblon paradise has to offer. I stayed 2 days and 1 night in this island and I must say that it is a more serene counterpart of its neighbor, and understated in terms of its natural beauty.

Once you are in the island, you can hire a habal-habal/ motorcycle for about P300-P500 per day. You can go visit notable spots like Lanas Beach (where sunset is amazing), be brave and do cliff diving at Kuding-Kuding and Angas Cliff (with a P100 entrance fee) or just stay at Hambil Beach which can rival Boracay’s white sand beaches (plus a spectacular sunrise view). You could also rent a boat that could bring you around the island and check some hidden caves and coves.  The over-all ambiance of Hambil is pretty laid-back… Really a great way to commune with nature.

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How to Reach Hambil:

From Caticlan Port: One may charter a tricycle to take you to Tabon Baybay, it is where you can find the port of boats going to Hambil (San Jose). A passenger boat leaves for Poblacion or Lanas, daily between 8AM to 9AM. So make sure you don not miss it. The travel time is around 1 hour (depending on the waves (which by the way can be really scary. The fare is P80-P100 per passenger. The trip back to Caticlan is between 5AM to 6AM. It is pretty early so you have to be early as well so you won’t be left behind.

Another option is from Boracay. In here, one may charter a boat good for 10 people for aboutP3,000 to P4,000 round trip day tour. Make sure to practice your acting and haggling skill. The travel time is about 45 minutes to an hour. Again depending on the sea condition. The boat will either dock at Brgy Lanas or at the Port of Said in Brgy Poblacion on the eastern side where Hambil beach is.

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Don’t be a wasted soul, be Juanderlust. Take it easy everyJuan.

Memories of Anawangin Cove: Zambales, PH

Sometimes you will never know the value of a moment until it becomes a memory.

– Dr. Seuss

This is a flashback post. It’s been 12 years and 7 months since the first time I have set foot in Anawangin. And today, I went on to visit memory lane and put into writing the memories of this trip with a group of friends.

It was January of 2005. Panagbenga Festival in Baguio City. For most of us living in the City of Pines, this means getting out of Baguio so as not to feel the congestion of the city. You see, people would usually flock their way to witness the annual flower festival. My friends and I decided to spend a 3-day getaway in Anawangin Cove. During this time, Anawangin was barely known as a beach destination. I have heard of it from my mountaineering friends who did an exploratory climb at this side of Zambales.

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So, 5 days before the Panagbenga, I did the planning for this getaway. Actually, the first plan was to saunter Mount Pinatubo. But then, I was more enticed to go on a beach escapade. So with limited time, I disseminated our itinerary hoping more of our friends will come join us on this trip. Luckily, 10 friends decided to come along even if most of them didn’t really have much of an idea on what to see in Anawangin. I remember myself assuring them that the place is something they’ll like just to make sure no one would back out on the last minute. Here goes our itinerary:

Day 1 – Baguio to Zambales: Mount Pundaquit Trek

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There are no direct trips to San Antonio, Zambales from Baguio. Since we have a friend from Pampanga who is joining us, we agreed that we would meet there. So we took a bus that passes by Mabalacat (Victory Liner), from there, Gladys (together with her cousin) fetched and all together we went to Angeles to take a bus that is bound for Iba, Zambales’ capital. It was a pretty long (and tiresome trip). All in all, it took us around 9 hours to reach San Antonio town proper.

Upon arrival, we decided to buy some fresh produce in the market since there are no stores or restaurants in Anawangin. After which, we took a tricycle to reach Brgy. Pundaquit – the jump off to Anawangin. Good thing I have a prior contact with a guide, Manong Alfring a local. We were asked as to how we would like to reach Anawangin. You see, there are two possible options. One is to trek Mount Pundaquit, and the other one is to ride a boat. Of course, the boat ride was the faster means however, we opted to do the climb. Some of our stuff was taken by Manong Alfring and his companions, who are taking the boat. So they will just wait for us at the beach camp.

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And so we went on with the hike. Our guide told us it was a pretty easy climb. Having climbed Pulag before this trip, I have to agree with what the guide claimed. However, as the sun goes up, the weather became warmer that eventually made almost everyone tired. It was a mistake on our end when we didn’t bring much water. The heat was sweltering and our water supply was rapidly dwindling keeping our pace slower. We had to motivate ourselves and patience became the key for us to reach our campsite.

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After 3 hours or so, we reached the peak and its breathtaking view made up for that very weary feeling we were all experiencing. It was a 360 degrees view and Anawangin Cove was already visible from where we were. The sea view further motivated the group not to give up. Two more hours and we finally reached Anawangin with the pine trees seemingly welcoming us. A few more minutes, and we were treated with a spectacular sun down. It was lovely. It made all the weary feeling melt down.

We did set up our tents (yes, there were no resorts/ cottages before in Anawangin), and cooked our dinner with the help of our guide. We had a simple dinner by the shore while sharing stories under the full moon. Recalling that night, it was so serene and really relaxing

Day 2: Anawangin Cove Explored

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Some of us woke up early, the others stayed a little longer inside their tents as they were still feeling fatigued from the other day’s trek. I went to stroll along the beach while taking some photos. Waking up to the sound of the waves and the smell of saline water was energy revitalizing! It is such a picturesque place. Looking back, Anawangin’s picture perfect backdrop contributed to my being a photography enthusiast. We actually spent almost the entire day wandering around. The waters of Anawangin was crystal clear and really refreshing so we had a great deal of time swimming or just wading in water. We also went up a hill where we had a jaw-dropping view of the cove and the mountains. The mini pine tree forest at the foot of the mountain is unbelievably photogenic. There is even an estuary that leads to the sea. And at the end of that day, we again waited for the sunset. It was yet another spectacular sundown.

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Day 3: Capones Island

Everyone had to wake up early on Day 3 because it was time to leave Anawangin. However, before going back to mainland Pundaquit, we went on for a side trip to a nearby island called Capones. There are actually two islands near the cove, however, we have to stick to our itinerary since we still have to go back to Baguio. It was a 30-minute boat ride amidst huge waves… From afar, the island looks like a shoe. The island’s main attraction is an old lighthouse. Unfortunately, it wasn’t open when we got there so we ended up taking photos along the shore amidst huge, exquisite rocks. I had an unforgettable experience here since I had a bit of an accident. I didn’t anticipate that some of the rocks were slippery that caused me to slip off and have some bruises. Nonetheless, the happy experience overshadowed this minor incident.

Before going back to Baguio, Gladys invited us at their home in San Fernando, Pampanga for a food treat and for us to freshen up ourselves. It was yet another long and tiresome bus ride. But who cares, we just had an awesome and adventure-filled trip! I told myself I’d be back in Anawangin. (And guess what, after 5 years since that first trip to Anawangin, I was able to visit it again. Plus, I was able to visit also another cove – Nagsasa and the other island near Capones, Camara). Yay! Cheers to more travels!

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*Thank you to Kuya Jerry for sharing some of his photographs to us.

Also, you might want to check my write up about other visit-worthy coves here in the Philippines.

Don’t be a wasted soul, be JUANderlust. Take it easy everyJuan.

Moon Fools: An EcoTourist Hostel (Bohol, PH)

It’s true that learning is a lifetime process. As an active traveler, I have come to realize that I am fortunate to learn a lot of things through various means. One thing traveling has taught me about (and is continuously teaching me) is the concept of “ecotourism”.

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The International Ecotourism Society (TIES) defines ecotourism as “Responsible travel to natural areas that conserves the environment and improves the well-being of local people.” This “take only pictures, leave only footprints” approach also is termed by others as ethical or responsible travel, and green or nature travel. With these terms and definition at hand, I don’t totally consider myself as one but I am trying my best to be one.

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And so when I met the owners of a unique hostel in Panglao, Bohol, who are both advocates of ecotourism, my interest in becoming ecotourism conscious was brought to a higher level. My conversation with Mari was one of those that reminded me of how much impact can I do as a traveler.

As someone who is conscious of his travel spending, it has dawned in me that we really do not need much money for us to become a more eco-friendly traveler. And one action I frequently do is by staying at a hostel. I’ll save for another post the reasons why I love staying at hostels. In the meantime, here are some ecotourism tips that I believe will help us travel-enthusiasts to travel more sustainably AND responsibly.

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*How about PACKING LIGHT: While most people know that a lighter baggage means saving money on check-in baggage fees, not everyone is aware that lighter load also means increasing the plane’s fuel-efficiency. This is one thing I had to remind myself every now and then because I used to pack really heavy! Now, I make sure I pack items that are light weight, quick drying, easy washing, and fewer clothes.

*SAVE ENERGY, SAVE WATER: Make sure that when you leave your room, you turn off everything that consumes energy from your AC, TV, lights, gadgets and the like. When taking shower, turn off the water outlet while shampooing your hair, or brushing your teeth. I love that Moon Fools have these little reminders randomly posted in their hostel.

 

*My mother mountain taught me to LEAVE ONLY FOOTPRINTS, all the time. This is to avoid harming native flora and fauna. Also, bring your own trash bag (especially during hiking and long travels). This is a very simple way of maintaining the outdoors/ nature beautiful.

*BE ONE with the LOCALS Take time to immerse yourself in the local scene by talking with the local people, and experience their culture — be it arts, food, music, and the like. Respect the differences you notice, respect their practices, and their laws. Also, support local goods and crafts. That way, you are also helping their community.

These are just some of those that I do whenever I travel. And I am glad I share most of these insights with Moon Fools Hostel’s staff and owners.

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Moon Fools Hostel caught my attention when I was looking for a place to stay at prior to my Bohol trip. It wasn’t there yet when I last visited Panglao in 2015. Without much information about this hostel, I relied on my instinct that it’s probably one of those few accommodations I’d love. And boy I was right… The moment I entered the hostel, I already knew that it was my kind of hostel – an eco-friendly one.

I was happy to have had a great conversation with one of the owners, Mari. That is when I have learned that she and her husband are very passionate about the environment. So it isn’t surprising that the materials used in the construction of their hostel are mostly recycled. It is very admirable as to how they have made use of recycled materials from their curtains (coffee sack) to pillowcases, bedsheet, plastic cups turned into plant pots, lamps from old jars, and even recycled wood materials turned into chairs and tables. Moon Fools Hostel shows that the very essence of recycling is re-using.

 

 

My stay at Moon Fools also comes with a simple breakfast that you get to prepare on your own. It usually consists of oats, raisins, mallows, some spices like cinnamon and nutmeg plus your choice of drinks (coffee, tea, or chocolate). Plus bananas too!

I also like the fact that they have these little ecotourist reminders all over their place – from the bathroom to the dining area. The local staff of Moon Fools is the usual endearing and respectful Boholano people. During my 2-night stay, I have noticed that I was the only Filipino. Most of my roomies were Europeans, and the other visitors I got to know were Koreans, Chinese, and Australians!

And oh, you’re probably wondering why Moon Fools… Mari told me that they have this fascination for full moon and the stars that is why various moon artsy stuff is seen inside the hostel, And I agree when she said that we are all over the moon about something or foolish at one point in our lives. I like that!!

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What else to expect with Moon Fools Hostel:

  • All rooms have air conditioning.
  • Free WiFi is available from the lounge area to the rooms.
  • The hostel offers airport shuttle services at an extra charge.
  • The hostel has a shared communal bathroom.
  • A 24-hour convenience store, a cafe and a restaurant are found on the 1st floor of the hostel.
  • There are motorcycles and bicycles for rent.
  • Water sports facilities are also available.

Moon Fools Hostel
Address: Ester A. Lim corner Hontanosas Road, Alona Beach, Panglao Island, Bohol.
Contact Number: 0925-588-9868
E-mail Address: hostelmoonfools@gmail.com
Facebook Page: Moon Fools Hostel

Don’t worry guise, the hostel is conveniently located along the main thoroughfare. It is a good 5-10 minute walk to the beach and various cafes, restaurants, ATM and the like.

If you’ve stayed at Moon Fools, how was your experience? I hope you had a great time as much as I did.

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Don’t be a wasted soul, be JUANderlust. Take it easy everyJuan.

 

Whakarewarewa, The Living Māori Village (New Zealand)

A nation’s culture resides in the hearts and in the soul of its people.                     – Mahatma Gandhi

When I am being asked about which 3 things I enjoyed the most during my New Zealand trip, I usually enumerate the following: my Hobbiton trip, the sunset, and ganet experience at Muriwai Beach, and the visit at Whakarewarewa, a Living Maori Village. (And yes, the challenge when you have to say the name of this village).

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The Māori are the indigenous Polynesian people of New Zealand who are said to have originated with settlers from eastern Polynesia and arrived in New Zealand by way of canoe voyages. They come in different tribes, and in the town of Rotorua, a tribe called Tuhourangi/Ngati Wahiao have welcomed local and foreign visitors into their village and has openly shared their way of life, including their land’s geothermal reserves.

Whakarewarewa, the Living Māori Village, allows every visitors a chance to experience a genuine Māori Village wherein the people live on a daily basis as they make use of the natural geothermal resources to bathe, cook, and even provide warmth to their homes.

The village features the renowned Pohutu geyser, several boiling mud-pools, steam vents, and even bubbling pools. During the village tour, I also saw how the residents prepare Hangi meals in using in-ground steam boxes and cook corn in the bubbling water of their geothermal hot pools.

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Hāngī food is said to be traditionally wrapped in flax leaves however, the modern Hāngī is likely to substitute the leaves with cloth, aluminum foil, and or even wire baskets. The baskets are placed on hot stones at the bottom of the hole. The food is then covered with a wet cloth and a mound of ground that traps the heat from the stones around the food. It is left for about three to four hours, depending on the food (whether fish or chicken) and quantity being cooked. I tried their hangi pie and it was surprisingly good.

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Our group was very fortunate to have a highly enthusiastic and informative Maori guide during the village tour. It was a great avenue to understand the history of the area, how the people manage to live in a challenging environment like Whakarewarewa Valley, and of course get to know more about the different historical landmarks within the village. This includes an active Marae (a fenced-in complex of carved buildings and grounds that belongs to a particular iwi or tribe), a World War II Memorial Archway, two historical churches, and tapu (sacred) burial grounds.

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The most exciting part of this visit was the cultural show wherein performances happen at 1:15 am and 2:00 pm. It was such a delight watch and listen as the Kapa Haka group of performers sing and dance some beautiful Maori song and dances. It was such an entertaining show.

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Fast Facts about Whakarewarewa Village:

  • Opening hours Daily (except for Christmas Day) 8.30am to 5 pm.
  • Guided tours on the hour from 9.00am with the last tour at 4.00pm.
  • Maori Cultural Performance times are 11.15am and 2 pm.
  • It is best to book online.

Whakarewarewa, The Living Māori Village

Phone:    +64 7 349 3463

Email:    info@whakarewarewa.com

Physical Address: 17 Tryon Street, Whakarewarewa Village, Rotorua, New Zealand

Postal Address: PO Box 6148, Whakarewarewa, Rotorua, New Zealand

You can check their website for booking and for more information. http://www.whakarewarewa.com/)

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Don’t be a wasted soul, be JUANderlust. Take it easy everyJUAN.

 

Travel Pills & Elixirs

Dr. Jim Nicolai, a former Medical Director of an Integrative Wellness Program, once said – “Where health is the destination, wellness is the journey…

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It isn’t a secret to my friends and colleagues that I have this undeniable knack for travelling and sense of adventure. I like to be marooned by the sometimes unforgiving sun or get soaked by the unpredictable rain whether I am at the beach or on top of the mountain. Weird as it may seem to some people, but getting lost nonchalantly in a foreign city enlivens my spirit. But these sense of enthusiasm and interest dampen when I get sick. That is why, I try my best to make sure that I am always at my best element… that I am always healthy – physically, emotionally, and even mentally!

A previous post of mine tackled about the basic things that I pack inside my (travel bag). One of the essentials is your personal medicine kit. So in this write up, I am sharing to you my simple health habits, the products I use and believe in, and some secrets (my travel pills and elixirs).

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Getting stressed and experiencing fatigue are common during travel. And surprisingly, there is no single cure for stress. If our coping mechanism isn’t able to resolve these stressors, they eventually take a toll on us and could lead to symptoms like headache, body pain, cough and colds, sleepless nights, and many more.

I am pretty sure these warning signs have at one point hindered you from going on a trip or a long-time planned beach getaway and the like. And it sucks to think that all the excitement would totally die down just because you are sick. I hate having headache, and I despise having cough and colds. So what do I do? As a pharmacist, I actually have some personal rituals and favorite products (yes, you read that right I have my personal biases). Hahaha! So read along.

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To make sure that I won’t get sick, I hydrate myself with enough fluid (not necessarily water) like juice, tea, and energy drinks (hello, Gatorade ® which is still my super tried and tested hydrating fluid). I eat alooooot of fruits. Shout out to my all-time favorites – watermelon, strawberries, bananas, and oranges (well, whichever is in season). If my trip involves some mountain climbing activity, I allot some time to do running and brisk walking.

Pack my med kit. So what’s inside it? I consider the following my travel pills and elixirs:

  • Vitamins (Enervon Activ ® now, Enervon ® syrup when I was young. Because it’s our mom’s choice.)
  • Hand Sanitizer and isopropyl alcohol (not ethyl)
  • Paracetamol – this is for my sudden headache which could really turn my mood 360 degrees, hahaha)
  • Tuseran capsule (I go for this one to manage my cough and colds).
  • Some anti-histamine (because at times I experience cold allergies).
  • Antidiarrheals (I usually go for loperamide).
  • Ginger candies like Gingerbon ® to suppress dizziness and vomiting.
  • Band-Aid J, cotton, wet wipes
  • Povidone Iodine (my antiseptic of choice)
  • Insect repellant lotions/ sprays (Off ® with chamomile is my choice).
  • Strepsils ® – favorite lozenge!

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During my recent Europe trip, my preparedness was tested when on several occasions I some sort of got sick. Traveling around the Baltic area (Latvia, Estonia, Lithuania) was memorable because I spent several days (7 am to 9 pm), walking around the key cities. I had terrible headaches at night and even got cough and colds. These were most likely due to the warm weather during the day and the nasty and biting cold temperature at night. I am really glad I have my anti-fever/ mild painkillers with me. Good thing too, I packed several Tuseran ® 2-in-1 capsules for my cough and colds. Since I am compliant with whatever medicines I take, in no time, I was back at my normal state – healthy and kicking. (PS: Being compliant with your medication’s dose and schedule is very essential to getting treated. That’s me being a pharmacist).

 

From cold Iceland to rainy Poland to humid Manila – my body was probably shocked with the outright adjustments it had to undergo. So I had another episode of cough and colds (and sore throat). This time, because of this sudden change in temperature, I had developed allergies (urticaria). Could you just imagine the burden, especially at night? I was worried because I have scheduled speaking engagement in Zamboanga in 4 days’ time.

Coincidentally, I was talking to physician friend of mine one time when she suggested that I try the new Tuseran Night ®. Keen about the medication I intend to take, I went on to search what it contains. Since it both contains diphenhydramine and phenylpropanolamine, I was convinced it will do wonders for my cough, cold, and allergies. (Shout out to Doc Nessa for the suggestion!) I still have a few pieces of my Tuseran capsules and cetirizine (anti-allergy meds) left from my EU trip but I opted to try out the new Tuseran Night ® (which by the way is in syrup form). And boy I am glad I did go for it because it’s like an all-in-one form of relief for my cough, my colds, my allergies PLUS I get to sleep better. Thanks to diphenyhydramine’s anti-allergy effect.  (Ooooooooooops, sorry guise if my pharma background is making your nose bleed upon reading these). Hahaha!

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Aside from preparing those medications, during any of my travels, I also drink a lot of tea products. Lemon – Ginger Tea and Black Mint Tea are my favorite. If I could get hold of honey, I would often mix it with my drink. Also, I like having probiotic drinks that usually helps me with my GI problems.

I have asked my equally adventurous friends to share some of their health tips and practices.

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The information I have shared here are my personal choices. Of course it is still best to go visit your general practitioner, or a doctor who can specialize the medicine you need during your travel/s. But, it is also good to note that as individuals who like travelling, make sure you always have an extra space for your own medication kit!

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Thank you to Jan of The Kapampangan Traveller, Hance of The Restless Pinoy Traveler, Jeff of Donde si Jepepips, Jonel of Eljontology, Jit (aka @aren_emdi), claro (aka @claro.i) and Aljen (aka @dirtikid).

So remember, stay healthy and safe travels. Don’t be a wasted soul, be JUANderust. Take it easy everyJUAN!